Domestic abuse in the news

The crime of Female Genital Mutilation was created in 1985 yet the UK has only seen one conviction. This article looks at the issue and considers this new guidance relating to new trends in cosmetic surgery.Jaswant Narwal, who is the chief CPS prosecutor in Thames and Chiltern, as well as the organisation’s lead on FGM cases, said: “Female genital mutilation is a sickening offence that can have a serious, lifelong physical and emotional impact on victims... we want to send a strong message that this crime does not have to be carried out in the UK for people to be prosecuted by the CPS – we will seek justice for people affected by this horrific practice. There is no hiding place. “We hope this new guidance will give victims, police and prosecutors the confidence and practical guidance they need to bring more perpetrators of this traumatic abuse to justice.” (Guardian)

Increasingly popular vaginal cosmetic surgery and genital piercing should in most cases not be prosecuted as female genital mutilation (FGM), according to fresh guidance issued by the Crown Prosecution Service.

Although this story has a strong Yorkshire connection, it reminds us all that FMPOs can be a useful resource when needed to protect people from Forced Marriages. (Yorkshire Post)

Although this story has a strong Yorkshire connection, it reminds us all that FMPOs can be a useful resource when needed to protect people from Forced Marriages.

The current time line for applications under the Domestic Violence Disclosure Scheme (Clare's Law) should mean that police have 35 days to consider ,where necessary, to refer to the local Decision Making Forum regarding a decision to disclose. The police do have the power to share in an emergency but this review could make some changes and speed up this process. (Lancashire Post)

The current time line for applications under the Domestic Violence Disclosure Scheme (Clare's Law) should mean that police have 35 days to consider and where necessary, refer to the local Decision making Forum regarding a decision to disclose. The police do have the power tpo share in an emergency but this review could make some changes and speed up this process.

This article highlights the fact that local authorities are better at spotting domestic abuse than a decade ago with 18,000 more children on Child Protection Plans than a decade ago. (BBC News)

Domestic violence, family conflict and drink and drug abuse are the biggest drivers of the rise in child-protection cases in England, says the Local Government Association (LGA).

The organisation representing English councils has surveyed the councillors in charge of children's services about the causes of a 53% rise in child-protection cases over the past decade. 
More than 80% identified domestic violence and substance misuse as being behind the increased numbers in their local authorities. 
An average of 88 children are taken into care each day and the LGA asked the lead councillors for children's services for their view of the most common 

The National Children’s Bureau (NCB) has published a report giving an overview of learning from the Safeguarding Early Adopter Programme, a cross government initiative which brought together 17 projects in England to develop approaches to the new multi-agency arrangements for safeguarding children introduced by the 2017 Children and Social Work Act.

In this report we have set out an overarching narrative on the learning of the 17 early adopter projects gathered over the last 10 months. We hope that, in being framed under 15 principles for effective implementation, it provides a useful reference guide to safeguarding and child death review partners across England. In using the principles of effective implementation, local partners will inevitably need to make some trade-offs.

Chapter three highlights the importance of engaging a wide range of stakeholders to enhance this area of work, and chapter four the importance of taking time with partners to reflect and consider what the best arrangements might look like. It is clear, however, that such activities do involve significant work amongst already pressured partners and business teams. This is why in chapter five there is significant attention given to how time and resources can be managed to best effect, and a potentially overwhelming change process effectively managed.

One year on since we launched ‘Safeguarding and protecting people for charities and trustees’, we’ve updated it. Here’s a quick refresher on what the guidance is for and a summary of what changes we’ve made and why.

All charity trustees have to ensure that their charity prioritises the safety of anyone who comes into contact with their charity. The guidance helps them do this and explains their duties under safeguarding law.

It also covers the wider measures they need to take to protect people from harm, and points them to some great practical resources from organisations such as NSPCC and Bond. It includes the infographic of the 10 points that trustees need to focus on: we know this has gone down well with many trustees.

There were 399,500 children in need at 31st March 2019, a decrease of 1% from 2018.

This decrease may in part be explained by a rise of 3%, to 343,000, in the number of children that ended an episode of need compared to last year. The number of children that started an episode of need in 2018-19 was relatively unchanged compared to last year at 381,900...

At 31st March 2019 there were 52,300 children subject to a child protection plan, a decrease of 3% from 2018.

The number of child protection plans ending during the year continued to increase, up 3% to 67,900. However, the number of child protection plans starting during the year fell by 3% to 66,700.

This critical piece is aimed at an alleged covering up of DA when disclosed about police officers being the perpetrators and listed in a "Super Complaint". The Centre for Women's Justice have a mission: To hold the state to account and challenge discrimination in the justice system around male violence against women and girls. (Guardian Online)

An official “super-complaint” is to be launched into the “boys’ club” culture within certain police forces that allows officers to abuse their spouses and partners without fear of arrest or prosecution.

The recent Queen's speech in parliament mentioned the forthcoming legal duty for local authorities to deliver life-saving support to survivors of domestic abuse. Early preparations for the upcoming DA Bill are getting underway. (Ministry of Housing, Communities & Local Government)

Survivors of domestic abuse will be provided with essential, life-saving support in safe accommodation thanks to new legal requirement upon every council in England from next year, Communities Secretary Robert Jenrick has confirmed.

As outlined in the Queen’s Speech, the government intends to amend the landmark Domestic Abuse Bill to include for the first time a statutory duty on councils to provide support.

The Bill will transform the response to domestic abuse to better protect victims and their children, ensure they have the support they need, as well as pursuing their abusers.

Many councils are already providing tailored support to those in need, but this move will bring an end to the postcode lottery of support for those fleeing abusive relationships.

November 25th each year is the start of the global 16 days of activism against violence to women and girls. For the UK, 25th November is national White Ribbon Day and this link will take you to the campaign website with ideas and inittiatives that you may want to adopt. This year they are promoting Youth Advocacy to allow youngsters to challenge and educate their peers. We have a few things running over this period but would love to hear from anyone about any events you may hold, that we can promote and hear how it all goes. (White Ribbon Campaign Website)

Every year around November 25th thousands of people in the UK bring come together to raise awareness and work towards ending male violence against women.

This year the theme of White Ribbon Day is “Creating a future without male violence against women” and we are focusing on engaging with young men and boys in particular.

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